Monday, May 21, 2018

NEWS RELEASE- Sequoia National Park Entrance Sign Restored


National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks News Release
For Immediate Release
Contact: Sintia Kawasaki-Yee, Public Affairs Officer
Phone Number: 559-565-3131
E-mail: sintia_kawasaki-yee@nps.gov
  Reference Number: 8550-1816
 Sequoia National Park Entrance Sign Restored
SEQUOIA AND KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARKS, Calif. May 21, 2018 - Sequoia National Park’s entrance sign, whose powerful presence greets visitors at the boundary, is back in place after almost six months of restoration. Since 1935, this sign has welcomed visitors to the nation’s second-oldest national park.

Carved more than 80 years ago, the mammoth 4-foot by 10-foot sign emerged from a slab of sequoia wood, from a fallen tree that might have seen two thousand years come and go. The carver, George Muno, served in the Civilian Conservation Corps, a remarkable program that put young men to work here and in other parks during the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Muno based the sign on the Native American profile on the old “buffalo” nickel, first minted in 1913. The idea of using such a profile on the park sign came from an earlier, smaller sign that also featured an American Indian man. Both signs were intended to honor Sequoyah, the Cherokee scholar whose invention of an alphabet for his language brought advances in literacy. Many believe that the giant sequoia trees were named for this historic figure.

The profile, however, bears no resemblance to Sequoyah or the people of the California tribes who have lived in these lands for thousands of years and who still call them home. The profile shows a stereotype of an American Indian from a tribe of the Great Plains, not someone from the Sierra Nevada.

This historic sign evokes many aspects of our history—from a famous American Indian to visual stereotyping of American Indians, from hard economic times to booms in tourism, from using sequoia wood to preserving sequoia trees, to name but a few. It reminds us of the challenges and benefits, cultures and crafts, people and resources that contribute to who we are as a nation.

“Our records show that the sign had last been worked on in 2002,” said Bill Schenher, Sign Painter for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.  “I hope that with the newer methods and materials we used this time around, the sign can last much longer, and visitors can continue to make this sign part of their history by photographing friends and family in front of it when they visit.”
Sequoia National Park Entrance Sign- Before Restoration NPS Photo
Sequoia National Park Entrance Sign- After Restoration NPS Photo
 - NPS -
About Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

These two parks, which lie side by side in the southern Sierra Nevada in Central California, preserve prime examples of nature’s size, beauty, and diversity. Over 2 million visitors from across the U.S. and the world visit these parks to see the world’s largest trees (by volume), grand mountains, rugged foothills, deep canyons, vast caverns, the highest point in the lower 48 states, and more. Learn more at http://www.nps.gov/seki or 559-565-3341.
- ### -
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks 
47050 Generals Highway
Three Rivers, CA 93271
FAX: 559 565-3730 | Phone: 559-565-3341 | www.nps.gov/seki

NEWS RELEASE- Sequoia National Park Entrance Sign Restored


National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks News Release
For Immediate Release
Contact: Sintia Kawasaki-Yee, Public Affairs Officer
Phone Number: 559-565-3131
E-mail: sintia_kawasaki-yee@nps.gov
  Reference Number: 8550-1816
 Sequoia National Park Entrance Sign Restored
SEQUOIA AND KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARKS, Calif. May 21, 2018 - Sequoia National Park’s entrance sign, whose powerful presence greets visitors at the boundary, is back in place after almost six months of restoration. Since 1935, this sign has welcomed visitors to the nation’s second-oldest national park.

Carved more than 80 years ago, the mammoth 4-foot by 10-foot sign emerged from a slab of sequoia wood, from a fallen tree that might have seen two thousand years come and go. The carver, George Muno, served in the Civilian Conservation Corps, a remarkable program that put young men to work here and in other parks during the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Muno based the sign on the Native American profile on the old “buffalo” nickel, first minted in 1913. The idea of using such a profile on the park sign came from an earlier, smaller sign that also featured an American Indian man. Both signs were intended to honor Sequoyah, the Cherokee scholar whose invention of an alphabet for his language brought advances in literacy. Many believe that the giant sequoia trees were named for this historic figure.

The profile, however, bears no resemblance to Sequoyah or the people of the California tribes who have lived in these lands for thousands of years and who still call them home. The profile shows a stereotype of an American Indian from a tribe of the Great Plains, not someone from the Sierra Nevada.

This historic sign evokes many aspects of our history—from a famous American Indian to visual stereotyping of American Indians, from hard economic times to booms in tourism, from using sequoia wood to preserving sequoia trees, to name but a few. It reminds us of the challenges and benefits, cultures and crafts, people and resources that contribute to who we are as a nation.

“Our records show that the sign had last been worked on in 2002,” said Bill Schenher, Sign Painter for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.  “I hope that with the newer methods and materials we used this time around, the sign can last much longer, and visitors can continue to make this sign part of their history by photographing friends and family in front of it when they visit.”
Sequoia National Park Entrance Sign- Before Restoration NPS Photo
Sequoia National Park Entrance Sign- After Restoration NPS Photo
 - NPS -
About Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

These two parks, which lie side by side in the southern Sierra Nevada in Central California, preserve prime examples of nature’s size, beauty, and diversity. Over 2 million visitors from across the U.S. and the world visit these parks to see the world’s largest trees (by volume), grand mountains, rugged foothills, deep canyons, vast caverns, the highest point in the lower 48 states, and more. Learn more at http://www.nps.gov/seki or 559-565-3341.
- ### -
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks 
47050 Generals Highway
Three Rivers, CA 93271
FAX: 559 565-3730 | Phone: 559-565-3341 | www.nps.gov/seki

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

NEWS RELEASE- Two Fatalities in Sequoia National Park


National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks News Release
For Immediate Release
Contact: Sintia Kawasaki-Yee, Public Affairs Officer
Phone Number: 559-565-3131
E-mail: sintia_kawasaki-yee@nps.gov
Reference Number: 8550-1815
 Two Fatalities in Sequoia National Park
SEQUOIA AND KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARKS, Calif. May 15, 2018 - Two fatalities occurred in Sequoia National Park, less than ten days apart, one on Mount Whitney and one on the Watchtower section of the Lakes Trail in Lodgepole.

On Saturday, May 5 a party of two reported that during their descent of Mount Whitney, they had found two ice axes and what appeared to be a blood trail leading to a body about 1,500 to 2,000 feet below the ice axes. That same day two other people called the park to report that their friend had not returned from a solo summit attempt via the Mountaineers Route.

The next day rangers recovered the body and transported it to Ash Mountain Helibase where it was turned over to the Tulare County Coroner’s office. The body was later identified as Eric Juliani, 29 years of age from New Jersey, the person reported overdue by his two friends the day prior. 

Conditions along the Mountaineers Route are still snow covered and icy, and will remain so for an undetermined length of time. Some written descriptions of the route note at least one area that holds “water ice” and poses significant risks to climbers attempting to pass it. Specialized equipment such as ice axes and crampons, and experience and training in using them, are generally deemed necessary to safely traverse this route at this time of year.

The second fatality was reported on Sunday, May 13. The park was notified of a hiker that had fallen from the Watchtower section of the Lakes Trail. Anton Dokov, 29 years of age from San Diego, slipped on the ice and snow, and slid over a cliff. Rangers responded that same day, but dangerous ice and snow conditions with a very steep slope, meant they had to turn around. The next day park rangers were able to find the body, but were unable to retrieve it due to the complexity and technical aspects of the recovery. On Tuesday, May 15 the body was recovered and transported to the Ash Mountain Helibase, where it will be turned over to the Tulare County Coroner’s office.

Mr. Dokov was hiking the Lakes Trail towards Pear Lake at the time of the fall. Hikers are cautioned that winter conditions still exist at higher elevations, and extreme caution is necessary. 

“Although we’re getting warmer weather in the valley, conditions at higher elevations are still very cold with snow and ice. Even the most experienced hikers with the best gear can encounter challenges in these conditions,” said Chris Trotter, U.S. Park Ranger.

For current trail conditions please visit the park website www.nps.gov/seki/planyourvisit.
 - NPS -
About Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

These two parks, which lie side by side in the southern Sierra Nevada in Central California, preserve prime examples of nature’s size, beauty, and diversity. Over 2 million visitors from across the U.S. and the world visit these parks to see the world’s largest trees (by volume), grand mountains, rugged foothills, deep canyons, vast caverns, the highest point in the lower 48 states, and more. Learn more at http://www.nps.gov/seki or 559-565-3341.
- ### -
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks 
47050 Generals Highway
Three Rivers, CA 93271
FAX: 559 565-3730 | Phone: 559-565-3341 | www.nps.gov/seki

NEWS RELEASE- Two Fatalities in Sequoia National Park


National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks News Release
For Immediate Release
Contact: Sintia Kawasaki-Yee, Public Affairs Officer
Phone Number: 559-565-3131
E-mail: sintia_kawasaki-yee@nps.gov
Reference Number: 8550-1815
 Two Fatalities in Sequoia National Park
SEQUOIA AND KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARKS, Calif. May 15, 2018 - Two fatalities occurred in Sequoia National Park, less than ten days apart, one on Mount Whitney and one on the Watchtower section of the Lakes Trail in Lodgepole.

On Saturday, May 5 a party of two reported that during their descent of Mount Whitney, they had found two ice axes and what appeared to be a blood trail leading to a body about 1,500 to 2,000 feet below the ice axes. That same day two other people called the park to report that their friend had not returned from a solo summit attempt via the Mountaineers Route.

The next day rangers recovered the body and transported it to Ash Mountain Helibase where it was turned over to the Tulare County Coroner’s office. The body was later identified as Eric Juliani, 29 years of age from New Jersey, the person reported overdue by his two friends the day prior. 

Conditions along the Mountaineers Route are still snow covered and icy, and will remain so for an undetermined length of time. Some written descriptions of the route note at least one area that holds “water ice” and poses significant risks to climbers attempting to pass it. Specialized equipment such as ice axes and crampons, and experience and training in using them, are generally deemed necessary to safely traverse this route at this time of year.

The second fatality was reported on Sunday, May 13. The park was notified of a hiker that had fallen from the Watchtower section of the Lakes Trail. Anton Dokov, 29 years of age from San Diego, slipped on the ice and snow, and slid over a cliff. Rangers responded that same day, but dangerous ice and snow conditions with a very steep slope, meant they had to turn around. The next day park rangers were able to find the body, but were unable to retrieve it due to the complexity and technical aspects of the recovery. On Tuesday, May 15 the body was recovered and transported to the Ash Mountain Helibase, where it will be turned over to the Tulare County Coroner’s office.

Mr. Dokov was hiking the Lakes Trail towards Pear Lake at the time of the fall. Hikers are cautioned that winter conditions still exist at higher elevations, and extreme caution is necessary. 

“Although we’re getting warmer weather in the valley, conditions at higher elevations are still very cold with snow and ice. Even the most experienced hikers with the best gear can encounter challenges in these conditions,” said Chris Trotter, U.S. Park Ranger.

For current trail conditions please visit the park website www.nps.gov/seki/planyourvisit.
 - NPS -
About Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

These two parks, which lie side by side in the southern Sierra Nevada in Central California, preserve prime examples of nature’s size, beauty, and diversity. Over 2 million visitors from across the U.S. and the world visit these parks to see the world’s largest trees (by volume), grand mountains, rugged foothills, deep canyons, vast caverns, the highest point in the lower 48 states, and more. Learn more at http://www.nps.gov/seki or 559-565-3341.
- ### -
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks 
47050 Generals Highway
Three Rivers, CA 93271
FAX: 559 565-3730 | Phone: 559-565-3341 | www.nps.gov/seki